The most famous planes used in World War II

World War II was a very dark time that found the Allied powers and the Axis powers going muscle against muscle at the expense of the rest of the world. As this period is looked at from our vantage point today, there is but bittersweet sentiment. Beyond the obvious horrors, World War II also became the canvas for the most awesome battles in the sky. Here are some of the most famous planes in World War II.

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Image source: youtube.com

The North American P-51 Mustang is tabbed as the greatest fighter of the war, in a time when the Allied armies were able to penetrate Europe. With its piston engine, which was the height of the technology at the time, the plane could go faster and higher than any other challenger. The P-51 Mustang allowed for most number of “Aces,” a term used for having five kills, for its pilots.

The Vought F4U Corsair earned a reputation as quite the shock trooper of the war. While other forces in the air and on the ground wrested control of the Pacific, it was this fighter plane that reigned supreme in the Pacific Islands. It was a very able ground attack plane that shadowed friendly troops that did their work on the plains and fields. The Corsair paved the way for the final battles of Iwo Jima and Okinawa.

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Image source: aircraftsandplanes.com

The Messerschmitt 262 had a huge impact during and after the war. Some variants of this aircraft were designed as rocket-loaded prototypes that reached the speed of sound. This was quite unthinkable back in the day. They say that if only Germany produced more of the prototypes in the war, the story of World War II might have had a different ending.

John Eillerman is knowledgeable on facts about World War II. His interest for the war stems from his admiration for his father, who joined the U.S. Army when he migrated from Hannover in the early stages of World War II. For more interesting WWII facts, follow him on Facebook.

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